The Gospel According to Mumford & Sons: I Will Wait

image credit: mumfordandsons.com

In a sort of modern British Invasion, one of the foremost folk bands in the world brings what looks to be another refreshingly hearty album to the landscape of popular music. English gentlemen Mumford and Sons release the highly anticipated record, “Babel,” on September 25, 2012 in the States. In the meantime, we’ve been allowed tastes of a few new songs via concert footage and a teaser for the single, “I Will Wait.”

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Their previous album, “Sigh No More,” contains undeniably spiritual themes strewn throughout the lyrics. A good bulk of the lyrical content merged brazen honesty with confident hope, admittance of failure and desire for refreshment. Many have noted the Christian-oriented references to grace, forgiveness, depravity, love, service, and the essential nature of the soul. The band has been quoted, saying, “We’re not a Christian rock band as such, the album deals with dilemmas every man deals with in life as do we. Faith is just one thing we’ve gone with. It’s one subject that can’t be ignored and we’ve tried to deal with it.”

The resonation of the human experience, faith, and love once again emerge in their newest production. See the teaser video for Mumford and Sons’ “I Will Wait” here (and a Red Rocks performance of it here).

Mumford and Sons: “I Will Wait”

Well I came home like a stone
And I fell heavy into your arms
These days of dust which we’ve known
Will blow away with this new sun

And I’ll kneel down, wait for now
I’ll kneel down, know my ground

I will wait, I will wait for you
And I will wait, I will wait for you

So break my step and relent
You forgave and I won’t forget
Know what we’ve seen and him with less
Now in some way shake the excess

So I’ll be bold as well as strong
And use my head alongside my heart
So take my flesh and fix my eyes
That tethered mind free from the lies

Raise my hands, paint my spirit gold
Bow my head, keep my heart slow

Cause I will wait, I will wait for you

Shadows of Truth

There are a few lyrical nods to faith and Christian spirituality. Here are some I caught:

  • Marcus Mumford and company again hit on the essentialness of forgiveness, being able to move beyond the wrongs one experiences from another. We must let go of sin and move forward in the way of Jesus, who forgives and loves us freely and deeply.
  • To “shake the excess” is a beautiful expression to remind us of the value of simplicity. Contentment arrives not when we’re able to gain everything we wish, but when we’ve been whittled down to only the most important things or people to us (Philippians 4).
  • Since Scripture tells us that the human heart is predisposed to selfishness (“wicked”), it’s wise that Mumford share his intention to use a combination of both head and heart to discern a path forward. Majoring on the heart makes one easily emotionally manipulated, while depending too much on the head makes one coldly robotic.
  • The songwriter admits his frailty and need for redemption when he says, “take my flesh, fix my eyes that tethered free from the lies.” Such words demonstrate a willingness to receive help from an outside source, at least outside of himself and his own perspective. The best help is often from those with completely different perspectives on something. Perhaps he’s expressing bits of his search for truth, redemption, and God.

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What themes do you see in Mumford and Sons’ new single, “I Will Wait?”

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One response to “The Gospel According to Mumford & Sons: I Will Wait

  1. “Since Scripture tells us that the human heart is predisposed to selfishness (“wicked”), it’s wise that Mumford share his intention to use a combination of both head and heart to discern a path forward. Majoring on the heart makes one easily emotionally manipulated, while depending too much on the head makes one coldly robotic.”

    Well put!

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